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Travel & Tourism industry news by Greek Travel Pages (gtp)

Greece Short Stay Accommodation Numbers Up in 2017

Photo source: Pixabay

Photo source: Pixabay

The number of overnight stays at short stay accommodation facilities in Greece, rose by 4.2 percent with arrivals up by 4.4 percent in 2017, according to a survey released by the Hellenic Statistical Authority (ELSTAT).

Photo source: Pixabay

Photo source: Pixabay

According to ELSTAT figures, the number of arrivals at the country’s short stay units came to 5.9 million against 5.6 million in 2016, with overnight stays at these establishments at 29.7 million in 2017 compared to 28.5 million a year before.

Broken down, the South Aegean Region recorded a 9.6 percent rise in the number of arrivals and a 5.4 increase in terms of overnight stays, followed by Epirus at 21.8 percent and 19 percent, Central Macedonia (3.3 percent, 2.8 percent), and Thessaly (8.6 percent, 9.9 percent) in 2017, compared with 2016.

Source: Elstat

Source: Elstat

Europeans accounted for the largest share of arrivals (89.3 percent) and overnight stays (94.7 percent) at these establishments. Broken down, nationals from the UK accounted for 5.5 percent of total arrivals and 18.4 percent of overnighters, followed by Germany (9 percent, 8.3 percent), Italy (7.3 percent, 6.6 percent) and France (6.1 percent, 3.9 percent). For travelers outside Europe, Russians marked the highest percentages at 4.8 percent and 5.2 percent, respectively.

To see ELSTAT’s data on arrivals and overnight stays in hotels and tourist campsites in Greece in 2017, press here.

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  1. Julie Gardiner Reply

    This is not happening in 2018 though. We have short stay accommodation and it been hardly used. We have very good rooms and have 5* reviews but the main problems are the all inclusives taking over the infrastructure. Big holiday companies take over the flights and once the all inclusive hotels are full so are all the flights. We need flights which leave room for independent travellers. These would use tavernas, car rentals and rent room businesses more than they do currently. We have to get them here first. The all inclusive visitors rarely have spare cash so don’t hire cars or move outside their hotels unless they have enough money and are in all inclusives because they prefer it for their family holidays. The tourist industry needs to reassess what all inclusives are doing to the little businesses. Even the profits from the hotels don’t go into the Greek banks as the tour operators probably pay only a small amount of tax in Greece.

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